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www.last.fm/user/kpike01

 

mutilatedmemories:

  • Destroy the idea that bisexuals are attention seeking
  • Destroy the idea that pansexuals are greedy
  • Destroy the idea that asexuals are broken
  • Destroy the idea that transgender people are confused
  • Destroy the idea that gender-fluid people are just indecisive
  • Destroy the idea that anything outside of heterosexual or cisgender is abnormal or fake

yagazieemezi:

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. “It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be.”

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself." (keep reading)

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Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

itscolossal:

Meredith Woolnough’s Embroideries Mimic Delicate Forms of Nature

Woolnough uses a special embroidery technique that involves a domestic sewing machine and a base cloth that dissolves in water after the piece is complete leaving just the skeleton. In a way, her process also mimics the natural process of leaves dying and drying up which, in turn, become the subject of her work.